Staff

2017 Staff

Adina Gordon

Adina Gordon

Adina Gordon finds an outlet for her loves of travel, music, dance and silliness by calling and dancing throughout the US and Canada, creating joy and minor chaos wherever she goes. Combining a voice that makes you want to do what she says with a commitment to using that power for good and not evil, Adina calls English, contra, and squares that cause spontaneous eruptions of joy on dance floors.

Will Mentor

Will Mentor is a contra and square dance caller from Northern Vermont known for his clear teaching, upbeat wit, and relaxed stage presence. He loves to choreograph evenings with a variety of dances and tempos that at times surprise and always delight, all the while keeping intact his guiding principle as a caller: “It’s about the dancers!”

Nova

Hailing from New England, Nova is a young contra dance band that weaves the sounds of fiddle, accordion, and guitar into a rich tapestry of sound. Nova draws from both traditional repertoire and original compositions to create versatile, high energy and driving dance music.

In the spring of 2013, Kathleen Fownes (Fiddle) introduced Guillaume Sparrow-Pepin (Accordion and Piano) to Everest Witman (Guitar and Feet). The trio’s undeniable chemistry became apparent as soon as they started playing. They continued to play together informally whenever possible, until 2014 when Nova began performing and playing dances. Nova plays local dances, dance weekends, festivals, concerts, and weddings throughout New England and beyond.

lydia ievins and Andrea Larson

Playing for English country dancing, Scandinavian dancing, and other stuff!

lydia ievins plays 5-string fiddle and nyckelharpa for Scandinavian and English Country dancing. Her absolute favorite thing about playing in either genre is the boundless opportunity to create rich harmonic lines. She has been awarded a bronze Zorn medal in Sweden for her playing in the Uppland tradition.

Andrea Larson has performed Swedish traditional music for the past 20 years and has been teaching fiddle/violin from her private studio for the past 15. She enjoys exploring new ways to share her treasure trove of new teaching ideas from some of Sweden’s best fiddle teachers. She is very enthusiastic about her newly developed workshop series on practicing, which she has now discovered to be fun after all!

Andrea and lydia have been playing Swedish-style fiddle together for the past decade, and spent an intense 2012-13 academic year studying in the center of the nyckelharpa universe, at the Eric Sahlström Institute. Much of their shared repertoire comes from central regions of Sweden, with a smattering of Norwegian and Danish and beyond. They are excited about their latest grand projects: bringing the younger hipper living slängpolska tradition to the US, and creating a new intensive weekend course for dance musicians.

Kate Barnes

Kate Barnes has been playing piano, flute and assorted other instruments for dancers for an embarassingly large number of years, and has been invited to most major contra, square, English and vintage dance events throughout the United States. She currently works with the bands The Latter Day Lizards, Bare Necessities, and Yankee Ingenuity.

The Vox Hunters

Armand Aromin and Benedict Gagliardi are musically bound by a shared love of traditional Irish music, which originally brought them together, as well as an eclectic and ever-growing amalgam of songs both inside and far outside the realm of ‘folk music’. With fiddle in hand, a couple concertinas, banjo and a pair of complementary voices, The Vox Hunters present an exciting repertoire of driving dance tunes blended with an unorthodox collection of interesting songs and musical varia.

The Vox Hunters’ philosophy is that the search for good songs is endless and satisfyingly so. We don’t aim to fuse genres, push boundaries, or redefine ‘folk music’ — we simply sing songs we like to sing in exactly the way we like to sing them. Our influences and inspirations are voices in the English, American, and Irish folk music realm, but we allow our ears a long musical leash.